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. and by the time i was engaging with the gender educators, i learned that you must always check the data. and i just couldn't find it. he did not appear that the research was anywhere that this factoid was documented. and it turned out that he had done a study for the department of education and it was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, she wasn't able to do it, the professor did a follow-up and he admitted that it wasn't exactly 81, it was less a matter something like that. but none of that, for some reason, the reporters of the time, including "the washington post", they reported this statistic as true. boys were treated much more respectfully and valuable and they assert themselves and girls are sort of lacking balance. that is exactly the opposite was true. a typical classroom, the boys are often sitting in the back to spring the known cause on them and it's true that they may get more attention in some cases, but more careful research shows that it's negative attention at times because boys are more unruly and so the teacher will say, who do you think is the president of
and being responsive and looking at workers compensation reform or hiving -- or having a highly educated labor sector. drive an things help economy. people in the past said, well, we really don't have enough fossil fuel supply. but now we know, through technology and innovation, having the good and fair regulations, that we do have energy supply. so my state of oklahoma, since 2011 when i took office because of our business-friendly policies, education, reform we have done, making government smaller and more efficient, we have seen our economy change. the per capita income has grown by 8% for a family of four. >> it is self-defense. you have a guy who will steal every last job from you if they can. rick perry -- he is glad they are up here right now. while we are up here talking, he had his people on the phone to ohio and oklahoma stealing their jobs. >> we fish where the fish are. and generally speaking, i am spending a lot more time in california or illinois and new york than i am in oklahoma. >> we just beat him in football. [laughter] >> you know how to hurt a person, mary. >> but li
, julie has done on affordable care act. a lot to talk about today including some disturbing education all rankings coming out. >> we'll get to that. we'll begin with the train derailment in new york. federal investigators are turning their attention to the engineer as new revelations of just how fast the train was going. the train was going 82 miles per hour when it took that curve. it should have been traveling at just 30 miles per hour. nbc's tom costello has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: on the tracks in the bronx mta crews lifted the remains of the broken train as crash investigators went in for a closer look. tons of twisted steel scraped and crushed from sunday's violent crash. the ntsb announced the two black boxes recovered from the train revealed a stunning development. >> train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30 mile-per-hour curve. >> reporter: 82 miles per hour. only six seconds before the train came to a complete second engine power was cutback. then the engineer suddenly applied full brakes. >> when i heard about the speed,
that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care, or a community that views her future as their own? that should offend all of us. and it should compel us to acts. we are a better country -- to action. we are a better country than this. so let me repeat: the combined trends of increased inequality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the american dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. >> president went on to say that a so-called deficit of opportunity, interesting phrasing there, is much more important than the fiscal deficit, the yearly fiscal deficit in this country which he points out is actually shrchging in his administration john. >> point out, this issue about the young people are disappointed with president and congress. >> part of the obama coalition that got him elected twice is young people, so-called millennials. folks at harvard has a unit that polled these folks. 18 to 25, bad news for the president, festival his approval rating down to 41%. that is a reflection of the population at large but down 11% since just thi
was a professor of american history in the cave from ohio and educated at ohio state. and graduated 1910 with a couple of sisters and my great-grandfather was german immigrants a and ohio state's 1926 even back then to be overwhelmed of the corporation's. and also one more thing, my father was part of that cycle of american history of the conservative serious locally every 30 years so he picked up the historical academic structures from my grandpa. >> they're all from the midwest so there was the therapy they brought to the east. debt was genetic civic given the current political climate but in the postwar years a strong conservative current of mccarthy of ohio. because they were witness there was the entirely different climate it did 15 seconds i will give a very remote part of south dakota that build a hydroelectric dam in the middle of nowhere at a store their expensive paid very good wages and change the lives of everybody who went through their. now coming back as doctors and engineers. of those courageous with the importance to get out and touch and feel what of those accounts that
called america works, education and training for tomorrow's jobs. what you find in america right is you do have companies have moved jobs overseas because of corporate tax rate, workers here, rules, regulations, or other types of policies. to try to get the countries to -- and they are, reshore the jobs back to america. in order to retain our jobs, we have to have the right skill our, the right education in nation to be able to provide those employers with the skills we need. now, we have a mismatch. back 55 years ago. of the jobs in america needed a high school degree to reach the middle class. your word, byron, middle class. to reach the middle class to make a good wage in america. ecause of technology, innovation, how we travel across the world and how we compete in global economy, now that number has dropped down it's not 79% anymore. it's around 35% of our jobs in high school a diploma, which means we have a big skill scant. it's in the manufacturing jobs, john. you can't show up with a high get l degree and expect to a job in a manufacturing plant. you have to have some typ
, for the first time we're actually budgeting continuing -- state dollars for continuing education. as we urge people to change their aroach to continuing education -- approach to continuing education from a kind of large auditorium, you know, you close the school for a day, you headache everybody hear the same lecture and precious little chance for real discussion between teachers and those that are leading the discussion. we're trying to change that model as well to be supportive of the kind of broader and larger change that we want to see made in the school systems across the state. >> so how much per pupil is spent in connecticut today? >> um, it varies widely. from district to district. it is one of the largest state programs, that is a kind of distribution of dollars in the education cost-sharing grant allocation. no district has lost any money since i've become governor, but the vast majority of the additional dollars have gone to those districts most in need. and that is a break with the it's. previously, if you put additional money into the education cost-sharing grant fund, it would
job today without some higher education, so we've helped more students go to college with grants and loans that go farther than before. we've made it more practical to repay those loans and today more students are graduating from college than ever before. we're also pursuing an aggressive strategy to promote innovation that reins in tuition cost. we have a lower cost so young people are not burdened by enormous debt when they make the right decision to get higher education. and next week, michelle and i will bring together college presidents and non-profits to lead a campaign to help more low-income students attend and succeed in college. but -- [ applause ] while higher education may be the surest path to the middle class, it's not the only one. so we should offer our people the best technical education in the world. that's why we've worked to connect local businesses with community colleges so workers, young and old, can earn the new skills that earn them more money. and i've also embraced an idea that i know all of you at the center for american progress have championed. and b
to escape poverty, because she lacks a decent education or health care. that should offend all of us. what drives me is a grandson, a son, a father, an american, is to make sure that every striving, hard-working, optimistic kid has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. dr. king once said, of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking. not anymore. if you still don't like obama care, you owe it to the american people to tell us what you are for. not just what you're against. >>> here at 30 rock, we are counting down to tonight's lighting of the famous rockefeller christmas tree. that war on christmas, a lot of hum bug, of course. but as president obama prepares to join in the national tree-lighting on friday, he's got a few other things to attend to. first, including a long list of policy goals that he wants to achieve for the american people. starting, of course, with the affordable care act. the affordable care for all. so just this afternoon, the president kept up his three-week push to promote the affordable care act. this time in a white
together, he a democrat, i, a republican. each other and share ideas on tax reform, on education reform. on getting things done. we love the environment on you can actually achieve results. that's the great thing of being a governor. i look at so many of the members of the utah state legislature who are here. and with each one of them, i can tell you stories about how we things done and the can-do attitude. it was remarkable. senate went on to the and became terribly frustrated with the culture that existed on that l hill, something evan knows a lot about. ournt on to china to become senior diplomat running the embassy there. nd we kind of regrouped a little bit later when joe and nancy jacobson, who was the power behind no labels initially came and said would you like to ecome part of the no labels movement. what on earth is no labels? is it a third party effort to ind of ship wreck the republicans and the democrats. is it a bunch of mushy moderates to get together to take over the world? none of the above. ome to find that it is a group that respects the fact that we system.two-party
be given one year to fix its own problems. the department of education reports the accrediting commission violated regulations in the review of city college. it says the commission failed to get enough educators on its evaluation teams as required. the report does not recommend taking away the commission's authority. the city college stands to lose its accreditation by the end of july. >>> a kayaker is dead after being attacked by a shark off the coast of maui yesterday. the man is 57-year-old patrick brianny of washington state. they say he was fishing from his kayak between maui and molukinni. brianny died a short time later. a lifeguard says stretches are being taken to keep people safe. >> we're disclosing the beach monitoring, making sure everybody stays safe. >> this latest incident is the eighth shark attack near maui this year. >>> here's dramatic video of a helicopter rescue yesterday to help a kayaker off tomalas bay. no word why the man got sick or his current condition. >>> a winter storm is dropping know in the greater lake tahoe area. a winter weather advisory is in effect r
is it the education outcomes continue to decline when we increase federal control year after year after year but yet our outcomes continue to decline? even this week, another international poll coming out for that. why is it getting harder to start a company, find a job, pay your gas bill? why is it hard to fill up your gas and pay your cell phone? it's increasing fees and control and americans continue to get frustrated because they know this is not what we were designed to be. we're doing too many things. we've got to get back to trusting the american people, our state leaders, our local leaders and we've got to set the standard for what leadership looks like in america by our rhetoric and by our actions. we can honor people and honor each other even in our differences, but we've got to get back to doing this nation's business the way that american people in their heart know it should be done, where their voices are heard and where they get to make the decisions. with that i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. miller, for five minutes. mr.
of economic development, improved education, enabling techniques for developing new energy resources. the challenge is our a mess. the free flow of ideas that test societies not yet ready to respond, or those wild card or network threats such as the nontraditional threats posed by non-nationstates cyber actors. these types of threats continue to test us on a daily basis. i think the world of cyber and everything out there in the generation for the of young people involved in getting an education today, and where you may be, as i look at my career backwards 33 years and look forward to the kinds of things i have experienced, what one can imagine, what i can imagine standing here today, projecting myself maybe 30 years ahead and trying to think of all of the changes i have seen and many of the others in this room that have been around a little bit, the kinds of dynamics we have seen change. in the information world in just the last work -- five or six years, facebook only came onto the scene in 2005. today, over half a billion people are connected via twitter. these are just some of th
institute, inc. captions copyright 1989 educational broadcasting corporation annenberg media ♪ is by movado, makers of the movado museum watch, the watch dial design in the permanent collections of museums throughout the world. additional funding for this program made possible by the financial support of... ( music ) rrat in 199 the national gall ofrtn washington of the dea of the painter sir anthy van dyck wi an extraordinary exhibition of about 100 paiings and oil sketches, gather from collections arnd t world. born in 15, van dyck's remarkable career took him from his native flanders to italy, and then to england as court painter to charles i, before the artist's death there in 1641.
not only had an incredibly active career, but some of the u.s. concentrated on higher education and educating himself. he is a man with three graduate degrees, including one from the u.s. naval war college, and i should add that we were proud to present him with an honorary degree here just a couple of years ago. i should not neglect to say, general flynn has been given many awards, including the defense superior service medal with three oakley's clusters, the legion of merit with an of leaf cluster, the brand star, the meritorious service medal and others that are not too numerous to mention. he is a great friend of this school, and we are honored that you could join us and the floor is yours. >> thank you. [applause] >> great. first, before i get into some formal remarks, i hopefully -- everyone got handed out one of these. it is that there are your see your you got it when you walked in. a pamphlet about the defense intelligence agency and other about who we are all we're doing a behalf of national security for this country. it will give you some idea about the direction of o
history at harvard who came from zien ya, ohio, and was educated at ohio state, and his -- he had, he gaunted, i think, around 1910. he had a couple of sisters who were teachers. his -- my great grandfather was a german immigrant, and they just -- and there's an interesting speech that my grandfather gave at ohio state in 1926 where he said even back hen in 1926 he said -- then in 1926 we're being overwhelmed by uniformity. you know, the corporations and the banks and everything like that, they're trying to squeeze the heart out of you. and this was -- and also my -- i was going to say one more thing and that's my father's theory of the cycles of of american history, that you have liberal periods followed by conservative periods roughly every 30 years, that was my grandfather's theory. and so he picked up a lot of his, even his historical academic structures from my grandfather. >> stephen? >> both our relatives on my mother's side and my father's side were all from the midwest, so there was a kind of prairie populism that they brought to the east when we were growing up. and it was g
not improved their scors scores muc. the education second called it the picture stagnation. >> and how the u.n. is using drones to keep the peace. >> and you wouldn't believe how much the partridge in a pear tree costs now. >> a dramatic rescue caught on tape. this is the moment a nigerian ship was pulled from under water after spending three days trapped in a tug boat. he shows his hand as he reaches out to alert the rescue diver that he is okay. he managed to survive by breathing in air in an air bubble and the boat overturned while pulling an oil tanker ovef off the coast of nigeria. he is the only survivor of a 12 member crew. >> the united nations has now started using drones. the u.n. says peacekeepers are flying unmanned craft to monitor the activity between rawanda and u began a began beganuganda. james bay has more. >> it's a first taking to the skies the u.n. has fleets of white painted suv's and trucks and helicopters and planes and now the first united nations unmanned aerial ai aircraft more commonly known as a drone. unlike those of the use it's equipped with only a camera not
to be educated and to get the health care that they deserve to have, we know that society benefits. where women and girls can participate in peacemaking and peace building as full members of society in trying to resolve conflicts, we know that resolution is more likely to be sustained. it is a great honor for me to have this award, but it is just a reminder of how much more we have yet ahead of us to accomplish. we have to make sure that tom's dreams, tom's life, the examples of the award recipients with us and those unable to come like the dalai lama and elie wiesel bring out each of us our own commitments to what we will do to further the cause of human rights, universal human rights, for every man, woman, boy and girl in the world. it is what tom would expect us to do to hold high his ideals. by accepting this award and by accepting this award and knowing that tom would not let me off the hook otherwise, it is something that i will continue to be committed to and every way that i can with every fiber of my being because the kind of world we want is a world in which the nelson mandelas and to
monday. dominoes brought up an idea over the summer but gave no education it wanted to deliver via drones. amazon, however, says its serious about its aspirations. this tech writer believes them. >> amazon doesn't do things in small ways. if they are going to deploy this, they want to do it on a wide scale. so presuming technology advances as it has at am zon and the f.a.a. gets its act together, i don't see how this doesn't become very large in about five years. >> here is how it would work. an order is boxed in a nearby warehouse, attached to the drone and off it goes to the delivery address. the device currently allows up to 5 pounds of weight. just one of the technical issues that would have to be addressed according to this law in rob on theics expert? >> how do we make them safe and make sure they are not going to fall out of the sky and run into something? provided those get ironed out, privacy concerns will crop up. >> it should have a privacy plan that's really rigorous. in other words, that you have to articulate to the federal aviation administration, how it intends to did be w
of the sixth sense, says there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> anest natean estimated 131 mn americans have gone online and spent big bucks. sales could top $2 billion. that would be a cyberrecord and 20% more than a year ago. online growth has been bigger than growth at bricks and mortar stores. and david strawser said it's been an especially hard year for retailers. >> the low-and middle-class has been tough this year. the housing sector has done well. home depot and lowes has done well. the rest of retail has really struggled. >> joining us is stephanie humphrey tech lifestyle writer for" efor welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> so how does this change over time? >> i don't think it's going to happen any time soon, either. i think what you're going to see is more of that technology integration kind of into the overall shopping experience. >> can bricks and mortar stores do anything to turn the tren
every morning, every day, 5am to 9 eastern with al jazeera america. >> start with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >> welcome back. we're talking about the pope francis effect and how the new pope is making waves and the globe, how do you not when you marriage. there is a lot of talk about what about pope's position is if these topics so we're going to try to clarify. father john what are the positions that the pope has issues? >> first of all he has talked about all these issues and by the way he is not backing away from the traditional teac
healthcare and education, modernizing the country's infrastructure, and pushing for racial healing. while his close relationships with foreign leaders like mom mad gaddafi and fidel castro drew criticism, he still visited the white house a number of times. in 2002, joshing w bush presented him with the presidential medal of freedom. barack obama met mandela only once, in 2005, when obama was still a senator. after just one term as president, mandela stepped down. but he did not slow his pace. his charitable foundation raised money for a variety of causes. he made his last major public appearance, the crowd honoring him with a thunderous ovation. the former first lady was at his side through his battles with prostate cancer that hospitalized him near the end. never, and never again, shall it be that experience, the oppressive of one for another. in fact, shall never effect on so glorious a human achievement. thank you. >> nelson mandela. the new south africa, dead at 95. we are about 50 teen minutes away from america tonight to continue our coverage, tell us what is coming up. >> yeah, john, i
the line. which is one reason why the current president is a symbol figure because he has the education of a 6th grader and he was a sheep herder. which mandela -- is a smaller group of black africans and it is a tribal clan that has produced nelson mandela, becky, but zula is a zoo loo leader. and this is a moment where black south africans are trying to reclaim the south african identity, and he was a symbol of their inclusion. >> this is going to a week celebration, at least, for nelson mandela, and i think that -- there was some who thought maybe they would wait until the morning to announce his death. >> but they didn't wait, and it is very -- as we with can see, it is the 2:00 a.m., and the crowd has just begun to get started. days of celebration. >> this is a very african way of celebrating life. and they are just beginning to redefine, and define his legacy, and what it will look like for years to come. for example, his grandson who is a close friend of mine, he is becoming the mandela campaign. which is is a foundation of rend braking the image of africa. you also talk about in
are much more highly educated and well trained. they are dealing with complex software systems and they are costing more because we invest a lot more in them and it costs more to retain them. there are opportunities in the private sector that are greater. part of the thing driving these military personnel costs to some degree is the technological advancement and the fact that we are expecting -- what we are expecting out of them in terms of training and performance is higher than it was 23 years ago. host: earlier you mentioned the cost of military pay. a "new york times" op-ed last month suggested that military pay should be put on the table. host: do you think it is likely that pay would be a target as the pentagon looks to cut costs? guest: i think that pay as a target is an interesting idea. i don't think anyone is going to flat-out reduce military pay. "the new york times" editorial notes this is a politically and emotionally fraught area of the budget to be debating. i cannot imagine an area where people would be saying you are going to be getting less than this year. wha
paying? >> well, a job that's better paying calls for a higher education. and, you know, if you don't have that, then it's hard to get a better paying job. and, you know, a lot of people cannot get a better education because of them having to work and take care of a home. >> and, mary, i understand you're also taking care of a daughter with a heart condition, two grandchildren. how old are you, if you don't mind me asking? >> i'm 59 years old. >> and, mary, i imagine then trying to move up in this position, as you say, without the access to education that could enable you to get another job is a huge problem potentially. when you began working all of those years ago, did you have a different outcome in mind? >> yes, i did. i never thought it would get worse. i've always felt that it would get better instead of worse. but it has made a turnaround. >> i want to also, mary, just give you -- let you listen to an interview we had yesterday with jamie richardson. he's a white castle vice president. we said to him, jamie, what would happen if the minimum wage were raised to $15 an hour for
. i'm just trying to safe you a little money. my job is not just to entertain you, but to educate you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. leave it to twitter to produce the ultimate question that is defining this stock market. including today where the dow sank 78 points. s&p back 7.2%. at jim query, would you buy amazon here? my quick response, two very different questions, yes and no. that's right. yes, i would buy amazon. no, it's not worth $400. welcome to the world of bull market discipline. the discipline to buy stocks that aren't cheap but are right. a discipline that will be tested in the next few days. at last because of today's last hour 7 sell-off -- >> sell, sell, sell! >> that shook people out of their complacency. i'm talking about the rigger to recognize what the market actually wants, though, not necessarily what you want. the dichotomy says you would rather have a portfolio that is hated and making money than be bound by concerns that may not be as relevant as they should be. let's start with amazon, which hit at an all-time high today, $399 before being repelled along wit
's still a lot of problems. there's defacto segregation, economic problems, educational problems that south africa needs to advance on in order to realize the society that nelson mandela had in mind for south africa. being in south africa, the folks there, from all different colors, all different backgrounds, all different socioeconomic levels they are talking about these things and really feel like together they will be able to do so much more. >> abc's lana zak, thank you so much. >> the coverage of nelson mandela's life and death does not end here. see how his story influenced pop culture and moviemakers later in this half hour. >>> another headline, the investigation in to she shooting of an american teacher in libya. ronnie smith gunned down while jogging at a u.s. consulate in benghazi. his murder comes days after al qaeda called for libyan attacks on u.s. interests. smith's wife and son returned to the u.s. for the holidays. he was set to join them next week. >>> a wicked storm slamming the nation this morning is far from over. a treacherous mix of snow and sleet crippling the south
children and 6 educators who were killed on that day. but they decided not to appeal after a court ruled to make those recordings public. >>> and now, to detroit, where the judge who approved the city's entrance into bankruptcy is calling that move an opportunity for a fresh start. the motor city now must address its $18 billion debt. the judge's decision was opposed by the city's unions, pension funds and retirees who claim that the debt will be settled through cuts to their benefits. mindful of that, the judge says that he will not sign off on just any proposed cuts. >>> the nation's capitol is a little brighter for the rest of the year after getting an annual touch of holiday glitz. >> house speaker john boehner flipping the switch last night on the capitol christmas tree. it's an 88-foot-tall spruce, adorned with 5,000 ornaments made by kids across the country. >> and it looks beautiful. >> a beautiful tree. i will say that, yes. >>> coming up, which state curses the most? the results are in. >> interesting. >>> plus, a california ceo and his family vanished. the frantic search for t
were damaged because of the strong gusty winds and cut on the region several educational facilities in the region the hospital for internal affairs department in the service center in shock since partially lost the roofs the craze of wind speed of up to sixteen the twenty meters per second was observed in the city of coming under some areas of the region wind gusts reached thirty four meters per second storm warnings are still in effect in jammu region. here are a few sections of the rose had to be closed meanwhile according to the ministry of emergency situations. the forecast for the next day our disappointing as well. an increase of wind of up to fifteen to twenty meters per second is expected almost everywhere in the country with a windstorm sleep in part in some places. one of the hezbollah command this was killed in the suburbs of beirut reported by readers according to the group's team and despite how somehow block is was one of the leaders of the islamic resistance in the close associate of hezbollah leader house on the surrounding a lot to switch out with the automatic mach
city. what is his reputation? >> his methods are incorporated into almost every single educational program about prescribing opioids and even accepted by the fda. >> but if you start to ask around a bit, you'll learn that his reputation among some former patients and their families is astonishingly different. >> his reputation is he's known as dr. death. >> known as dr. death? >> yeah. >> that's how your wife's doctor was described? >> dr. death. >> multiple overdose deaths at the life tree pain clinic which webster ran for more than a decade now hover over him. >> he went unconscious. >> there are allegations of irresponsible prescribing practices and in the case of one patient, influencing what was written as the cause of death. >> here's the interesting part. >> roy bosley's wife carol ann first went to the life tree pain clinic in 2008. years earlier her car had been broadsided. >> she did not have the seat belt fastened and went through the windshield. >> after several operations on her spine, she managed her pain with low doses of painkillers. she's still functioning doing ev
in the air about all of this. i take this from an educational point of view. our people to on see who was being subversive to our government, who was working with foreign interests. this is nothing new. unfortunately the nsa, as much as we hate it and it leaves a to taste, they have a job do. when you take a look at multimedia, like facebook, twitter, so on and so forth, you have people constantly pushing one side or the other and if they are following these little groups online and nobody knows who these groups are. now that facebook is a public , who is spending the money to antagonize people to take extreme size of -- extreme --es of republican, democrat if you take a look at what is out there, it is extremely hateful, extremely pointed, and a violent tone. why are people having such a the time understanding that government has a job to protect its people? if you are going to put something stupid out there you are responsible for your actions. host: will any of these surveillance disclosures changed the way you use social media like facebook? caller: no. the bottom line is if i am
, health and human services, education committee irs some of the social security and small business administrations, as well as a number of other federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. veterans are counting on us to solve these challenges. operates at, v.a. large health care -- integrated health care systems, may be one of the larger ones in the country, on hundred 51 medical centers, 871 clinics, 300 vet centers, and i know there are 70 mobile outreach clicks that reach out into the most rural areas defined veterans who live remotely. over 1700 remote access points nationwide. beyond health care, v.a. revised $10 billion in education assistance annually, second only to the department of education. v.a. guarantees nearly 1.8 million home loans, the only zero-down into the inner nation, and our foreclosure rate is lowest among all categories of mortgage loans. as the ninth largest life insurance and price, with 6.7 million clients and 95% customer saxes faction -- satisfaction rating. to the support of the congress and the leadership of the president and the invites an
are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >>> a train flies off the tracks in new york killing four, injuring dozens. harrowing tales from survivors. the question this morning -- what went so wrong? we are live with the latest on the investigation. >>> the white house's deadline to fix the obama care website has passed but have the technical problems been fixed? what the obama administration is saying and what still needs to be done. >>> fury in the streets as thousand riot in ukraine and threatening to overcome that government. is revolution in the air? we are live. >>> welcome back to "early start." quite a situation there. i'm john berman. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. nice to have you with us this morning. >>> the ntsb investigators have recovered on so-called event recorders from a metro north commute train. that may help determine the cause of the deadly derailment in new
peer, open counselorring young people to get educate about what is available under the affordable care act and encouraging them to sign up. and so for that we are grateful for your effort. now i have a little bit of a surprise. which isn't probably that much of a surprise. you seat the ram. they didn't actually come here for me. they came here in order to capture on film the person who has come to giver you a special shoutout for your efforts. please stand up and join me in welcoming the president of the united states. [cheering and applause] hello, everybody! hello, hello! good to see you. everybody sit down! good afternoon! [cheering and applause] welcome to the white house. it's a little bit of rowdy bunch. the -- well, it is wonderful to be with all of you and i couldn't be more appreciative of automatic the stuff that you guys are doing all across the country in your communities in your organizations. there was a time when i was a youngen in school. after five years in this office, people don't call
many ngo whose have agitated and lobbies for the change of education. we are not giving government easy ride, and i thank nelson mandela for that. south africans love democracy, many people died for it. many many people died for it. i think we are effecting the same effect of the recession, over the -- and trying our best. of course, we have other problems, many of them a legacy, but many of them of our own san francisco, but i have such in ordinary people, and we'll use the ballot. and nelson mandela gave us the right to do that, and i have no doubt in the next election, or the one that comes afterwards that democracy will survive in this country. >> tell me something, you have given such good perspective. there was a ruling on somebody -- it was very clear, this person had been in the apparatus of power, policeman fora secret serviceman. and was thought to be guilty of a lot of crimes. nelson mandela came out and said this is a country that respects the rule of law. perhaps you are thinking of is killing of chris americanny. >> >> yeah, that we talked about earlier. >> yeah, and it wa to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. stick with innovation. stick with power. stick with technology. get the new flexcare platinum from philips sonicare and save now. philips sonicare. [ female announcer ] gold bond intensive hand cream. now my hands look great. [ female announcer ] gold bond intensive hand cream. this stuff really works! >>> welcome back to the sports lead. it is pretty obvious what the sports lead is. it is hard to ignore what many people are calling the greatest college football game ever played. auburn's stunning, really unheard of walk-off win over its bitter rival, number one, alabama, formerly number one, alabama. you get a true sense of the agony and the ecstasy through the play by play guys. they probably think they've seen it all and they probably pretty much did, until this weekend. first, here's the play as the crimson tide's broadcasters saw it. >> 57 yards to win the iron bowl. he spots it, kick on the way. it's got length. it is sailing. it is short. it is grabbed about eight yards deep in the e
children and six educators were shot to death by 20-year- old adam lanza. a judge ordered the audio material released under the state's freedom of information law. the suspected gunman in the deadly shooting at los angeles international airport has made his first court appearance. paul ciancia entered no plea today to charges he killed an airport security officer and wounded three other people last month. he was denied bail. the 23-year-old suspect was wounded by police during the attack. in economic news, a survey of leading corporate chief executives found they're more optimistic and plan to increase hiring. at the same time, growth at service sector companies last month was the weakest since june. the conflicting data left wall street looking for direction. the dow jones industrial average lost almost 25 points to close at 15,889. the nasdaq rose a fraction of a point to close at 4,038. there's word today that the great majority of american silent films are now gone forever. the library of congress reported 70% of the 11,000 feature-length movies have been lost or destroyed. only
to make you a little money. my job is not just to entertain you but to educate you. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. what a day. what a day this was! we got an employment number that had something for everyone. and it catapulted the averages higher. dow gaining 199 points. s&p falling 1.12% and the nasdaq climbing. stocks had been going down. for five days and the expectation that interest rates had to rise, because there would be such a huge burst of hiring. investors had been selling down their holding, they thought growth was too robust. instead we got a cinderella payroll employment number this morning that gave people a reason to stop selling bonds and to start -- >> buy, buy, buy! >> -- stocks, which had been dropping all week. it's a pretty amazing thing to watch. the same stocks that have been hammered going into the jobs report spring back to life. the banks, industrials, housing-related names, the consumer product stocks. almost as if they were all priced to a huge bond selloff which would've driven rates up, and when they didn't happen, we put the labor report under the cate to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." this is the story for the folks who take a shower after work. where people of all races where allowed to participate. his activism moved his nation away from its racist separatist apartheid history toward one where every vote counts. nearly two decades later, our country which was founded on democracy is still struggling with voters' rights and suppression based on age, race, and class. republican lawmakers around the country are working hard to chip away at voting rights. even the supreme court, especially in key swing states like ohio. ohio went for president obama in both of the last two presidential elections. voters had to endure some of the longest lines in the country to cast their ballots. after striking down key provisions of the voting rights act, republicans are doing everything in their power to turn every state red this way. now, republicans are especially worried about our next guest. ohio state senator nina turner has gained in popula
education advocacy group in the district. i was wondering if you have any suggestions for early career scientists. how should we keep moving forward in these next couple of years? it is going to remain tough, even if we reach some sort of a deal. are the voice that i am most concerned about. i am glad you are moving in science policy. we need expertise there. many people in your situation would like to continue to do research and are finding it challenging to identify the path forward for them to do so. nih, we're doing everything we can to provide that kind of support. we are increasing the grants that are a bridge between a postdoctoral fellowship and an independent faculty position. we are making it possible for individuals that come in for their first nih grant application to only compete against each other instead of the established investigators that may have more of a track record. trying to give first-time investigators a leg up. thatl have to recognize while this is a historic downturn, the case for nih support is so strong, support for nih is so strong across parties and hous
for education for every child so that we could be the first generation in history where every child went to school. and he warned us when we had that press conference, he said that to get every child to school we would have to end child labor, and we'd have to end child marriage and we'd have to end the discrimination against -- a campaign that he and his wife have been involved in ever since. and typically, nelson mandela at the beginning of his conference said that the cause was so urgent, they had now come out of retirement so that he could prosecute the cause. and at the end of the press conference, he said it was now up to the younger generation, and he was returning to his retirement now. [laughter] and then i visited him in south africa the week that his son died of aids. and while mourning and in grief and shocked by the event, he insisted in coming out to the waiting press with me. and he said that aids was not to be treated as a moral judgment. it was to be treated exactly like the tuberculosis that he had suffered as a disease in need of cure. his greatness as vast as the cont
voters rejected a tax hike to fund public education. look at history. populism works on college campuseses but looks a guy like bill bradley or howard dean it doesn't really work. stuart: we are riding a big piece, your newspaper. >> reading the wall street journal editorial page. stuart: the hard left is -- they used the word reckless, stronger stuff than that. >> a set weekend have all these kinds of fiscal fantasies as they put it. and a couple existed -- stuart: she wants to raise social security benefits and tax everybody. >> social security is broken and you can't promise american voters something you can't deliver, it is irresponsible and future generations will pay. they sounded like mitt romney in his op-ed. very refreshing. stuart: you are closer to politics than i am. uh battle between moderate democrats and the hard left, you say who wins? >> it depends how badly -- the minute this thought that can out you saw and other groups try to shut down this debate. it is not conversations they want to have. this is a hallmark of the obama era not just demagoguing t
back to some fund or something. >> the education system allegedly. >> yes. >> we get to the crazy stuff out there. the arctic air. we begin this half hour with the ice, the snow and arctic air slamming two dozen states from the west coast to the great lakes. >> parts of northern california are covered in white stuff this morning. blowing snow making for a treacherous commute. the midwest is bearing the brunt of it as citrus growers brace for the worst. here's abc's brandi hitt. >> reporter: preparations are underway for the big chill. the snow already blanketing parts of minnesota and north dakota. >> it's terrible. it's terrible. >> reporter: half of the country is in the path of a polar express and its bitter blast of cold air as it moves south. >> it is wicked. i've never seen it like this before. >> reporter: look at how temperatures are expected to drop by 30 to 40 degrees over the next several days. >> it's january-like cold only it is early december. also, we are looking at temperatures that will challenge records. >> reporter: homeless shelters are
are going to have to get up and understand this program. it is going to take a while for the educational process to work. we will put a small fine on this year of a few dollars. $95. guest: the next year, the fine goes up. and the next year. there will be increasing pressure to get everybody in. the reason is very simple. to need healthg care at some time or other for something. the idea that i can wait until i am sick and then i will jump in, that means you're a free rider. if you are in an automobile accident, who pays for it? host: was it shortsighted to have a small penalty the first year given the problems we have seen? what if people do not sign up because they sated paoli is $95, i will pay that -- because they say the penalty is $95, i will pay that? guest: that is a political decision. should have been $5,000 or five dollars. we picked 95. if it was $200, more people would want to get in. you would have had the initial bill coming out with a $500 fine if you don't sign up. jumping up in the air about that. was it the right number, i don't know? host: how did you -- did you come
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